The Canadian-Jordanian’s Weaving a Home project presents an interesting flexible solution to the need for lightweight, mobile, and structurally sound shelters for disaster zones. The shelters developed by architect and designer Abeer Seikaly are inspired by traditional basket weaving techniques and the flexibility of snakeskin.

The tent skins are double-layered and hollow, allowing for weatherproof entrances and for water piping and electrical cables to run between the layers. The design also incorporates water collection, solar power generation, and solar water heating systems. The natural channels formed by the skin collect and direct water to a storage point. The thermal properties of the fabric used to make the shelter serve the process of generating power from solar radiation and heat collected water for showering.

The shelter is extremely mobile, easy to fold up and transport.

Beautiful Woven Refugee Tents Get Their Power from the Sun

Drawing inspiration from traditional basket weaving techniques and the flexibility of snake skin, the designer uses weatherproof fabric drawn between durable, curved plastic tubing. This creates a structurally sound tent that can handle both compression and tension loads. The double-layered fabric tent skins are also hollow, allowing for weatherproof entrances and for water piping and electrical cables to run between the layers.

 

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